Bella HD Mouse

Normally, a mouse would not really be given much attention. As long as it aids the PC user in the proper interface to be able to perform necessary tasks in the gaming and work sector, nothing else really matters. But this new mouse, the Bella HD mouse seems to offer something different for the avid gamer and graphic editor users.

Bella bills this wireless RF pointing device as an HD Mouse, but its neat trick is not in its 1600 dots-per-inch rez or 3000 frames-per-second response. Aimed at video editors, it gives you gestural control, so when you move your wrist forward and back, or left to right (x and y axis), you can intuitively jog-shuttle through video clips.

Working on Macs and PCs, Bella’s software lets you create 20 presets for each piece of software you’re running, giving you lots of opportunities for customization of its five buttons. With its 20-foot range that can go through walls, we’re thinking of its possibilities with a home theater PC, shuttling through clips to find just the right spot, or programming in a volume control.


3Dconnexion SpacePilot PRO

Game developers can really improve gaming requirements this time around as suitable interface devices have become more advanced and appealing today. With that in mind, 3Dconnexion introduces the SpacePilot PRO to provide easier access to the power of professional 3D applications, fewer interruptions in the design workflow, and superior comfort.

Specifically, the SpacePilot PRO features a new color LCD Workflow Assistant, second-generation QuickView Navigation technology, Intelligent Function keys, and an improved design for enhanced comfort and control. With better assistance and graphic, you can expect better graphic rendering and output based on the new tools available in the market today such as that of this one by 3Dconnexion.

“3Dconnexion’s 3D mice have rewritten the rules on the way design engineers and professionals interact with 3D environments,” said Dieter Neujahr, president of 3Dconnexion. “Our new SpacePilot PRO builds on our market-leading industry experience, delivering the most powerful 3D mouse we’ve ever made. It enables increased performance that ultimately results in better designs, created in less time.”


Goodbye Mice Hello Touch Screen

Touch Screen technology is obviously the new craze as far as providing an alternative interface in the world of PC computing. One day, they may even replace the standard keyboards or mice, two PC components that are needed to enjoy the privileges of using a PC.

At the moment, the real issue is cost. Technology comes with a price and apparently this is one aspect that is the stumbling block of consumers who want to make the jump to new technology. Actually that has always been the case. As far as which technology to use, here is one design that is bound to point us towards that concrete proof of PC interface shifts.

Proposed to be sold as a stand-alone unit the HP LiM (Less is More) concept is set to feature a 19? transparent touch OLED screen along with a wireless keyboard. The touch screen slides down to create a more ergonomic touch experience and easy navigation. It also features a virtual trackpad thus cutting down on mouse costs.

It does seem enticing to look forward to promising tomorrows. But the matter of cost is also another thing to consider. During these times of economic recession, all we can do is wait for economies to improve. If not, all of these will remain concepts and restricted to people who can really afford them.


Computer Solutions for the Disabled via Gestures

Using a computer should not always be limited to people without disabilities. While some interfaces through computer accessories as the keyboard and mouse may become a shortfall, it remains that new solutions are bound to be on the horizon to help broaden the use of computers for the benefit of the ones who are unfortunately disabled in nature.

Remember virtual reality? Well it looks like we are being drawn to its second coming. Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia seems to have come up with an alternative interface gadget known as the “datagloves” that allows the computer to monitor the person’s hand or shoulder movements. This input can then be fed to a program, a game, or simulator, or to control a character, an avatar, in a 3D virtual environment.

So once this system has been perfected, it looks like the use of computers have gone a bit broader and no longer limited to the people who employ normal means of maximizing the privileges brought about by the computer age.

“We developed two gesture recognition systems: DESigning In virtual Reality (DesIRe) and DRiving for disabled (DRive). DesIRe allows any user to control dynamically in real-time simulators or other programs. DRive allows a quadriplegic person to control a car interface using input from just two LEDs on an over-shoulder garment. For more precise gestures, a DataGlove user can gesture using their fingers,” the authors said.

The evolution of widening the computer utilization scope is only to be expected. Technology is aggressively covering all bases to help people, both normal and disabled”, appreciate their true intent. With these developments, another potential privilege for people who feel limited has been opened.